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Double Dragon Publishing has released Impossible Gold, ASA author Ronald K. Myers’ fifth novel, and sequel to Dillinger’s Deception.

 

 

Using old timer’s stories about “Youngstown tune ups”, John Dillinger dealing cards at the Green Parrot Tavern, the machine gun turret-protected Jungle Inn Casino, and hand-         and-knee coal mines, Myers brings the past to the present and takes the reader on a wild ride.

In this latest masterpiece, young meet old, Blondie and the trio from Dillinger’s Deception are a little older and a little wiser, but can they avoid car bombs, cross raging rapids of
        the Shenango River, or survive surroundings like the machine gun turret protected Jungle Inn Casino and win the battle for impossible gold?


C Trick by Donald M. Cooper
Before the all-volunteer Army, there was the draft. This meant that most young American men had to decide how they were going to meet their military obligation. As the Cold War dragged on and the Vietnam War heated up, how a person met this obligation assumed critical importance. The choices were stark. If you were in college, you were safe. If not, you could wait to be drafted with the understanding that you could be sent to Vietnam as a combat soldier, or you could volunteer for an assignment that offered the chance of avoiding infantry combat in a rice paddy. Volunteering, however, also had a price. You would serve for a longer time, often in a foreign country far away from friends and family. "C Trick" tells the story of some of those who volunteered. The book is a tale that describes how one group of young citizen-soldiers met their military obligation during the last half of the Sixties. The book describes what it was like to be a soldier in a special Army unit stationed in what may have been the most important Cold War hot spot. Using prose from the era, the book captures all the humor and frustration experienced by young men coping with the rigors of military life. The reader will experience the frustration of these men when they were expected to perform difficult technical work in an important national security facility while also dealing with military absurdities. This book captures all the details of how these soldiers worked, played and tried to avoid military life while serving in the Army. It is a very refreshing account of how Cold War soldiers spent their time while their lives were on hold.


NPIC: Seeing the Secrets and Growing the Leaders: A Cultural History of the National Photographic Interpretation Center
by Jack O'Connor
This is a history of a little-known CIA office that discovered most of the Cold War Strategic secrets of the Soviet Union. It also produced more future leaders than any other office in the intelligence community. The book explains how two leaders at NPIC created and reinvigorated the culture that led to both of these outcomes


Comments:
Indeed, I would say that interpretation of aerial and space based imagery during the 1960s through the 1980s resulted in most of the really important strategic intelligence learned by the US during the Cold War with the Soviet Union.  In my opinion, without it, it is possible or even probably that the US would have been engaged in a shooting war with the USSR. And without it we certainly would not have been able to enter into any arms control treaties with the Soviets. So if one wanted to assess in hindsight the "bang for the buck", imagery collection and analysis systems were some of the most cost effective expenditures on national level intelligence collection of the US during that era.     
 
NPIC was the "National" Photographic  Interpretation Center which has been folded into
a new government agency called the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency.  Although NPIC serviced the DIA and many DoD customers, most of NPICs senior leader were CIA employees.  
 
CIA also had a stand alone contingent in the same building but was not technically part of NPIC.  That contingent was called the Imagery Analysis Service (IAS) when I was there and soon after the name changed to the Office of Imagery Analysis (OIA) which was a bump up in stature and recognition in CIA. 
 
In essence each contingent received the same film whether from a U-2, SR-17, or a satellite mission. 
That put us all in constant competition with each other.  And NPIC hated to be scooped by the
CIA contingent or any other.  Understandably, when we did find something of importance that NPIC
photo interpreters (PIs) missed it had bragging rights.  
 
On a personal note, my Army Security Agency (actually NSA) training and experience in SIGINT, HF Communications and electronics in general, gave me an advantage over many other PIs  assigned to interpret imagery of Soviet and Chinese electronics installations that paid off in my early career. Actually, in writing this I think I realized it today for the first time. 
 
Jack Stuart 

The Orange Turn by Ronald K. Myers
Nineteen
sixty-nine, Chitose veteran, Ronald K. Myers’ futuristic The Orange Turn has been released.  The sequel to his Amazon.com best seller Stay On the Blue Grass, 
The Orange Turn is Myers’ fourth published novel. It is about CEO John McQueen, a man who earned the privilege to live in the luxury and protection of the blue grass.  But if the portly Captain Sproat gains control, he will use newly found powers and technologies of Orangeville.  Then, the world will have to find a new and more powerful source of control; and .McQueen’s luxury will be taken away.

If mystery spikes your interest, Dillinger’s Deception will be a good read.

In, I’m Gonna Cut Your Ears Off, Breed and his friends definitely did not come from an ideal American family.  To make matters worse, Breed and his friends need to get away from a psychopath who wants to cut their ears off, and they have to stay away from older kids who use puppies for baseballs.

On the other side of tracks, Breed and his friends try to live a normal life in Traptown, a place with false-front buildings and mill worker bars that propagate dead end mill values.  Here, the odor of open sewers and vicious dogs at the edges of back yard burning dumps jump out at Breed and his friends.  As if that were not enough misery they go into a wild-dog-patrolled, rat-infested dump.

Dangerous Detour, where Chitose and Shemya are used, is almost completed; however, this wild tale will have to be approved by NSA.

EBooks are available from world-wide publisher Double Dragon Publishing and just about any eBook publisher.  Trade paperbacks, which are the size of a hardback, are available only from Double Dragon Publishing.

Cheers,

Ronald K. Myers




Threads of War is about a Midwest American boy who is ripped from his riotous , and somewhat ribald teenage years, and placed into the United States Army. His intellect and predisposition for the ability to learn languages lands him a position in the elite Army Security Agency where he is trained at the Presidio of Monterey to become a Vietnamese linguist and spy. Completing his linguistic academia, and ribald antics, Lee Tailor is shipped of to Davis Station at Tan Son Nhut Airbase in Saigon where he and his side kick Rooster their spying skills to help defeat the communist aggression. In the end an unseen force undermines the Americans and paves the way for the communists to finally occupy South Vietnam. Threads of War reveals the real reason the Vietnam War ended as it did.
Ho Chi Minh was not a great strategist. So who was responsible for the fall of Saigon? The mastermind is revealed in "Threads of War."
 "Threads Of War " by Glenn Fannin
 
"Threads of War" book trailer: 



Stay On The Grass by Ronald K. Myers
My novel Stay On the Blue Grass has been released by Double Dragon Publishing.

The story begins in a Blue Town where Humpy-Dumpty-shaped pig people are afraid of green grass.  A Dinky has escaped.  It is spreading the green-grass virus.  If Sergeant John McQueen captures the Dinky, it will be his five-hundredth capture.  He will be proclaimed a prince of peace and granted the right to reproduce.  He will own an OvalCar and choose a gorgeous mate.  In the safety of an ocean of blue grass, he will raise a family.  But there is something he doesn’t know.

The futuristic novel can be viewed on Double Dragon Publishing, Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble, kobo, and just about any eBook publishing site.
Three other novels have also been accepted for publication: The sequel to Blue Grass: The Orange Turn, and the thrillers Dillinger’s Deception and Impossible Gold.
I am working on another thriller: Dangerous Detour,, which uses Chitose and Shemya locations.

Cheers,
Ronald K. Myers (Chitose 1969)



We Served in Silence by Glenn Fannin
Hey, how about all the great bunch of guys who served in the Army Security Agency? There really were a lot of dedicated guys in the ASA. Wonder how many of you guys have made a trip back to Fort Devens? We had some great times didn't we? Ever drink too much of that Naraganset beer? I won't tell if you don't!!! Do you still have one of those teal blue scarfs? I do... and my ASA patches.
Yes we all signed contracts agreeing not to say anything for 29 years. Well... the 29 years is up and I wrote a bunch of my experiences in a novel. I call it a novel because it had to pass NSA pre-publication inspection. Well, I sent it in and it passed. Now I am ready to share it with all you retired ASA guys. For those of you who don't know me my name is Glenn Fannin. I was at Ton Son Nhut, Cam Rahn Bay, Pleiku and Marble Mountain. Flew on one of those funny looking P2-V Neptunes and a OV-1 Mohawk. Saw some action and caught a big metal frag in my leg. Ouch!!! Anyway, I wrote a book about my experience and I would like you to read it. Sure to bring back some old memories. The book was written in concert with a screenplay. So don't go expecting a a dull biography or jounal because it is an action packed adventure! "We Served In Silence" is written from the view point of enlisted men.

Overview
(Rated R) Wild! Crazy! Absolutely INSANE people in charge of our national security in the Vietnam War!
A story of Army Security Agency agents in the Vietnam War in 1968. From the draft, basic training and spy training to the war. Their lives and loves are exposed and the characters come together to accomplish their missions on the ground, air and water.

The outcome of the war may depend on what may be described as "M*A*S*H" meets "Catch 22" in this action packed adventure.

Includes shocking new theory on the capture of the U.S.S. Pueblo! Action packed chapter on using Swift Boats as spy platforms.

Since the cracking of the "Enigma Code" the deadliest weapon has been code breakers. These unlikely warriors make the difference in every war since. This story shows these soldier boys at play in the ASA. They are both sentinels and shooters engaged in top secret missions.

The first novel in a quatrain. Watch for the next in the series "The Men Behind The Iron Curtain." It is about the Army Security Agency in Europe during the Cold War. To be released later this year. "The Dragon Hunters," a story about the ASA in Asia, will be released next year. The fourth novel has been started but has not yet been named.

The writing of the screenplay for "We Served In Silence" is in production. Buy your collector's copy today of this first issue of a story which can not be told in one book.

Publisher and editor Mrs. Glenn Fannin (E. Jo Fannin).

Rated (R) for violence and explicit sexual content.




Unlikely Warriors
By Lonnie M. Long and Gary B. Blackburn
In early May 1961, a U.S. military aircraft taxied toward a well-guarded terminal building. The plane slowed to a halt; steps were maneuvered up to its side, and the door was pulled open. The tropical night air was heavy and dank, and the moon shone dimly through high thin clouds. On board the aircraft were ninety-two members of a specially selected team. The men were dressed in indistinguishable dark suits with white shirts and dark ties, and each man carried a new red U.S. diplomatic passport inside his breast pocket. The men held copies of their orders and records in identical brown Manila envelopes, and each man’s medical records were stamped “If injured or killed in combat, report as training accident in the Philippines.”
In such clandestine fashion, the first fully operational U.S. military unit arrived at Tan Son Nhut Air Base in South Vietnam. The unit was so highly classified even its name was top-secret. It was given a codename, a cover identity to hide the true nature of its mission. The unit’s operation was housed in a heavily-guarded compound near Saigon, and within two days of its arrival, Phase I was implemented. Its operatives were intercepting Viet Cong manual Morse communications, analyzing it for the intelligence it contained and passing the information to the U.S. Military Assistance Advisory Group-Vietnam. The Army Security Agency was on duty.

After over a decade of research and three years of writing, I am proud to announce the publication of Unlikely Warriors,The Army Security Agency’s Secret War inVietnam, 1961-1973. The book is available on the iUniverse/bookstore website, as well as, most major retail websites such as Barnes and Noble. Simply search, Unlikely Warriors. We need the help of all Army Security Agency veterans to make sure this story is told. For too long we have “served in silence.” You can help. Each of you are in touch with other ASA vets. Please make sure they are aware of the book and make sure your family knows of your service. You can also find us on Facebook and soon on our own website, www.asasecretwar.com. Thank you for your consideration, Lonnie M. Long and Gary Blackburn

Marshall and His Generals by Stephen R. Taaffe
A great read for anyone interested in military history is the new book by Stephen R. Taaffe, “Marshall and His Generals” (University of Kansas Press).  This book is the first and only book to focus entirely on the selection process of World War Two generals and their performances, both stellar and disapointing.  Steve is a military history professor at Stephen F. Austin University in Nacogdoches Texas. He is the son of Dick Taaffe who served on trick 2, as an 058.2, attaining the rank of E-4 at the 12th ASA Field Station in Chitose from March 1958 to March 1960.
 
Steve has written four other books dealing with Military History;  “Commanding Lincoln’s Navy: Union Naval Leadership during the Civil War”;  “Commanding the Army of the Potomac”; “The Philadelphia Campaign, 1777-1778”;  and “MacArthur’s Jungle War: The 1944 New Guinea Campaign”; and is a two time winner of the Army Historical Foundation’s Distinguish Book Award.

 
General George C. Marshall, chief of staff of the U.S. Army during World War II, faced the daunting task not only of overseeing two theaters of a global conflict but also of selecting the best generals to carry out American grand strategy. Marshall and His Generals is the first and only book to focus entirely on that selection process and the performances, both stellar and disappointing, that followed from it. Stephen Taaffe chronicles and critiques the background, character, achievements, and failures of the more than three dozen general officers chosen for top combat group commands--from commanders like Dwight Eisenhower and Douglas MacArthur to some nearly forgotten.

Taaffe explores how and why Marshall selected the Army's commanders. Among his chief criteria were character (including "unselfish and devoted purpose"), education, (whether at West Point, Fort Leavenworth, or the Army War College), and striking a balance between experience and relative youth in a war that required both wisdom and great physical stamina. As the war unfolded, Marshall also factored into his calculations the combat leadership his generals demonstrated and the opinions of his theater commanders.

Taaffe brings into sharp focus the likes of Eisenhower, MacArthur, George Patton, Omar Bradley, Walter Krueger, Robert Eichelberger, Courtney Hodges, Lucian Truscott, J. Lawton Collins, Alexander "Sandy" Patch, Troy Middleton, Matthew Ridgeway, Mark Clark, and twenty-five other generals who served in the conflict. He describes their leadership and decision-making processes and provides miniature biographies and personality sketches of these men drawn from their personal papers, official records, and reflections of fellow officers.

Delving deeper than other studies, this path-breaking work produces a seamless analysis of Marshall's selection process of operational-level commanders. Taaffe also critiques the performance of these generals during the war and reveals the extent to which their actions served as stepping stones to advancement.

Ambitious in scope and filled with sharp insights, Marshall and His Generals is essential reading for anyone interested in World War II and military leadership more generally.

This book is part of the Modern War Studies series.

“A cogent, well-researched and important contribution to our understanding of Marshall and his corps, field army, and army group commanders.”—Mark A. Stoler, editor of the George C. Marshall Papers

“Provides a marvelous synthesis of the specialized literature on the dozens of leading generals—some famous, many obscure—who directed the military campaigns in the European and Pacific theaters of war.”—Michael Schaller, author of Douglas MacArthur: Far Eastern General

“A superb portrait of a group of army officers that deserves to be read by everyone interested in World War II.”—Jonathan House, author of Combined Arms Warfare in the Twentieth Century

“A crisply written study and effective introduction to the relationship of Marshall and his lieutenants as they waged war in an extremely complex international conflict. It deserves a wide readership.”—Kevin C. Holzimmer, author of General Walter Krueger: Unsung Hero of the Pacific War


Chitose Road by Bob Ruehrdanz

Bob Ruehrdanz [Camp Chitose '53-'55] has written a new novel about Hokkaido and our famous Camp Chitose. Filled with the sights and sounds of a time when many of us were stationed 8612 during the 1950s and Chitose Road was edited by Joyce Gilmour, at www.editingTLC.com
Chitose Road is about a strange cast of Americans stationed on the Island of Hokkaido in the early 1950s which involved espionage, romance, and crowded living conditions. The men learned how to interact with the Japanese culture during and after the Korean War.

Bob Ruehrdanz will send you a signed copy of his new novel Chitose Road. A surprising, thought provoking blend of satire and drama with great depth and insight. His novel moves smoothly through Jim’s experiences and interpersonal relationships with unexpected force. If you liked Catch-22 & M*A*S*H, You’ll enjoy CHITOSE ROAD.

To purchase Chitose Road for $14.99, or, the Kindle version for $4.99, go to “Amazon.com,” then “Books,” then enter “Chitose Road.”

Dear Phil,
I received a wonderful surprise and an honor today, Chitose Road earned an award from the Military Writers Society of America, and they will announce the winners at their national convention on October 1, 2011. Please tell your friends to contact my web site https://google.com/sitechitoseroad8612/home or ChitoseRoad@sonic.net As I have a small supply of Chitose Road books on hand for a reduced rate of @14.99, plus shipping of $2.82, or faster for $5.65 Thank you all for your good wishes and wonderful reviews.

The following email came from Joyce Faulkner, President Military Writers Society of America who wrote; Dear Bob, I'm pleased to announce that your book, Chitose Road was nominated last week for a Special Korean War Book Award for 2011. A national media release will go out this week announcing all of the finalists. We will also be “Tweeting” the individual nominees on www.twitter.com/MWSAPresident and we'll announce on www.facebook.com/MilitaryWritersSocietyofAmerica. There will be four possible winning positions - Gold, Silver, Bronze, and Honorable Mention. In this category, there will be two runners up. Gold will also receive a monetary prize from the Center for the Study of the Korean War at Graceland University. Announcement of the Winners at the Awards Banquet Conference held on October 1, 2011, at the Airport Marriott in Pittsburgh, PA. Please look to the latest Dispatches at: http://www.redenginepress.com/dispatchesjune2011.pdf

Quotes from people who have read Chitose Road:

    Jim and Linda of Sonoma, CA

“Bob, I’m already hooked! The dialog in the opening scene between Jim and Ollie at Fort Devens is superb and intriguing.”

    Rev. David of Sebastopol, CA

“I have set off on the Chitose Road and am enjoying every minute of the journey. It’s well written, tight, keeps moving, and keeps the reader involved. I’m “hooked” and look forward to experiencing what is to develop.”

    Joyce of Brooklyn, WI

“FANTASTIC! You have given me the confidence to learn how to publish via CreateSpace. I’m truly so proud of you, Bob, congratulations!”

    Bobette of Santa Rosa, CA

“Started reading – I was right back in a Quonset hut on Okinawa in 1946. The military jargon that I lived with all my life, and experiences I shared with my husband. I’m only on page 100 and I’m anxious to find out about Jim.”

    Susan and Bruce of Clayton, CA

How wonderful to see your amazing story in print! Thank you for sharing your spotlight with two old friends.”


I have just been reading a great book about NSA and all of the supporting organizations, called "The Secret Sentry" by Matthew M. Aid.  It is based on  the recently released, unclassified history of NSA.  Gives a good overview of what we participated in over the years. All of the guys who served in Vietnam should read the part concerning that period of time. Really recognizes the outstanding role of ASA in the COMINT collection during that period.  According to the author, COMINT was the greatest source of intelligence during the latter part of the war.

Hat off to all who served there.  Please pass this along.
Dick Spooner


ZIG-ZAG IN JAPAN
-
From one of our members.  Richard "Dick" Burnette Chitose 59-61
This book provides an informative but personal glimpse of army life in Japan as described by an American fluent in the Japanese language. His wild episodes with U.S. military police and the Japanese police lends insight into how knowledge of that language saved him from fines and punishments by the authorities but opened the doors of Japanese society closed to most Americans. His experiences show "the real Japan" and represent the flavor of life at U.S. military bases there. As a perceptive recorder of life around him, author Burnette reveals a youthful enthusiasm with blending his life with those of his many Japanese aquaintances and his American friends of the post baseball team.Whether rollicking with Japanese girls or throwing out a baserunner from shortstop, Zig-Zag portrays the All American type of enlisted man who finds life in the army an introduction to discovering a new world as he surveys the landscape riding a 600cc motorcycle. Feeding a dog rice or fishing with rice, entering a segregated public bath house, being pulled over by a Japanese trooper riding a Harley-Davidson, or sleeping on the floor between wife and her mother are all true accounts of this down-to-earth story. On two occasions he made the Japanese newspapers and on his departure to America in 1961 was feted at home plate by the commander of the 12th US ASA Field Station (Kuma Station) at Chitose, Hokkaido that won the inter-service baseball championship thanks in part to his outstanding play.

ZIG-ZAG IN JAPAN can be purchased for $15.95 from the website www.authorhouse.com/BookStore/ItemDetail.aspx?bookid=21835
or phoning 888-280-7715 Book Order Hot Line.


Richard,
   My name is Clint Stapleton and I served in Chitose from 1969- 1971.  I wanted to tell you how much I enjoyed your book.  I saw it on the Chitose Asa web site and ordered it.  The day I received it in the mail, I couldn't put it down.  The stories  and your adventures reminded of the places and adventures I had while I was there.  Thanks for writing the book and I would like you to sign it if we can ever be in the same place.
 
   Thanks again for the trip back to Kuma Station.
 
Clint Z. Stapleton
 
Clint,
Your praise was the first nice comment I have ever heard. Wow!. All readers, excepting those who have never been to Chitose, remain silent except to say it was too short. Yes, I will be very happy to sign it when we have a chance to meet. I am now going to frame your words and post them on my wall.
Thanks for your kind words.
Dick
 


Treason in the Blood -- Anthony Cave Brown
Military Intelligence (Army Lineage Series) -- John Patrick Finnegan & Romana Danysh (Govt. Printing Office)
The Price of Vigilance  -- Attacks on American Surveillance Flights by Larry Tart and Robert Keefe. (Recomendation from Dennis Buley SEMA WebMaster)A tribute to our airborne reconnaissance brothers who have paid the ultimate price and to their families. Covers US airborne collection from WW II to the recent Navy EP-3E incident with considerable attention paid to the shoot-down of C-130 60528 over then Soviet Armenia. Chitose mentioned on pg. 134-135 (home base for a Feb. '55 RF-86 mission that overflew Khabarovsk).
Body of Secrets Anatomy of the Ultra-Secret National Security Agency -- James Bamford (See Puzzle Palace below)
Dragon Lady The History of the U-2 Spyplane -- Chris Pocock
The Master of Disguise My Secret Life in the CIA -- Antonio Mendez
Treason In The Blood by Anthony Cave Brown (pub Houghton Mifflin Co, C 1994). About a quarter of the book is the story of H. St. John Philby and the other three quarters deals with his infamous son Kim.

Kim Philby became committed to communism in his college days (1934).  As a member of upper crust British society, Kim was tasked by his Soviet handler with the infiltration of England's Secret Service. He took and passed the required boards but two of his former professors refused to provide character references because of his known communist leanings. How he weaseled his way into British intelligence is a remarkable story of luck, bluster, and intrigue that evokes many painful questions. He was not alone in his penetration. Ultimately he became know as one of the 'Cambridge Five'. He was not definitely exposed until 1963 even though there were many indications of treason throughout his active agent life.

During WW II he was privy to Ultra. At the end of WW II he was placed at the head of R5 the British Secret Service office of counter-espionage principally targeting the Soviets. Needles to say he did an incredible amount of damage in that capacity. From 1949 to 1951 he was the liaison between British intelligence and the CIA, FBI, NSA, and Canadian secret services working out of the British Embassy in DC.

Kim finally defected to the Soviet Union from Beirut January 23, 1963 as his cover collapsed. He continued to make trouble for the west even while ensconced in a comfortable KGB financed apartment in Moscow. He died May 11, 1988 of a heart arrhythmia and was buried with honors as a hero of the Soviet Union.

St. John Philby, Kim's father was also something of a traitor to the British empire. He began his career as a British civil servant in India. He was eventually canned from his position as a low-level secret service official because of his temperament. He eventually ended up in the near east during WW I. He wormed his way into British Intelligence where he rubbed elbows with Lawrence of Arabia etc.. After the war he managed to finagle his man, Ibn Saud, into the monarchy of what later became known as Saudi Arabia. This did not set well with his seniors who had another candidate in mind. St. John further angered Imperial Britain by championing the oil interests of (US) Standard Oil over that of British Petroleum.

The author is himself a well educated Brit. The book is well written and documented but not an easy read. There is a lot of complex interwoven detail but, thankfully, the author frequently comes to the rescue with reminders of persons and facts we may have forgotten. The reader may want to have a dictionary handy while reading it unless your vocabulary includes such words as; soporific, doyen, miasma, etc..

While the story of the two principals is compelling enough, the reader will also be rewarded with lots of historical tidbits that surface throughout the book. For example, during WW II, the Germans, (with certain Spanish factions) had set up a chain of 14 infrared detection stations in the Gibraltar Straights linked by radio to submarine wolf packs. These stations would have wreaked havoc on the North Africa campaign. You will have to read the book to find out Philby's part in this operation.

Hardcover. 677 pages, 16 page index, 34 pages of footnotes, 16 pages of photographs. Availability; out of print but still available as a used book (Amazon & B&N).

The EC-47 Experience (written and compiled) by James C. Wheeler (self published, printed by Swearingen Ink Printing and Publishing, (C) 1999) Thirty chapters on the personal experiences of the author and other contributors with Project Phyllis Ann (Combat Cougar, Sentinel Eagle, and other project names) which was the incorporation of Airborne Radio Direction Finding equipment aboard the venerable, WW II vintage C-47 "Goony Bird" for service during the Viet Nam war. The installation of the equipment was done under contract by Sanders (recently purchased by BAE from Lockheed Martin).

ASA vets who served in SEA will find this interesting as the various detachments of the 6994th AFSS units that flew the EC-47s were actually under the operational control of the ASA's 509th RRG.

Well documented including many photographs and drawings. Msgt. Wheeler (Ret.) was a flight mechanic detached to AFSS. Many of the chapters are contributions from AFSS 'back enders' who give first hand descriptions of what missions were like including descriptions and operations of the equipment and positions. There were approximately 30 C-47s converted to this mission and considerable effort is made to account for each.

Paperback. 240 pages, table of contents, no index. Availability: can only be obtained directly from the author at: http://www.ec47.com

Treason In The Blood by Anthony Cave Brown (pub Houghton Mifflin Co, C 1994).  About a quarter of the book is the story of St. John Philby and the other three quarters deals with his infamous son Kim. Kim Philby became committed to communism in his college days (1934).

As a member of upper crust British society, Kim was tasked by his Soviet handler with the infiltration of England's Secret Service. He took and passed the required boards but two of his former professors refused to provide character references because of his known communist leanings. How he weaseled his way into British intelligence is a remarkable story of luck, bluster, and intrigue that evokes many painful questions. He was not alone in his penetration. Ultimately he became know as one of the 'Cambridge Five'. He was not definitely exposed until 1963 even though there were many indications of treason throughout his active agent life.

During WW II he was privy to Ultra. At the end of WW II he was placed at the head of R5 the British Secret Service office of counter-espionage principally targeting the Soviets. Needles to say he did an incredible amount of damage in that capacity. From 1949 to 1951 he was the liaison between British intelligence and the CIA, FBI, NSA, and Canadian secret services working out of the British Embassy in DC.

Kim finally defected to the Soviet Union from Beirut January 23, 1963 as his cover collapsed. He continued to make trouble for the west even while ensconced in a comfortable KGB financed apartment in Moscow. He died May 11, 1988 of a heart arrhythmia and was buried with honors as a hero of the Soviet Union.

St. John Philby, Kim's father was also something of a traitor to the British empire. He began his career as a British civil servant in India. He was eventually canned from his position as a low-level secret service official because of his temperament. He eventually ended up in the near east during WW I. He wormed his way into British Intelligence where he rubbed elbows with Lawrence of Arabia etc.. After the war he managed to finagle his man, Ibn Saud, into the monarchy of what later became known as Saudi Arabia. This did not set well with his seniors who had another candidate in mind. St. John further angered Imperial Britain by championing the oil interests of (US) Standard Oil over that of British Petroleum.

The author is himself a well educated Brit. The book is well written and documented but not an easy read. There is a lot of complex interwoven detail but, thankfully, the author frequently comes to the rescue with reminders of persons and facts we may have forgotten. The reader may want to have a dictionary handy while reading it unless your vocabulary includes such words as; soporific, doyen, miasma, etc..

Besides the two principals, the reader will be rewarded with lots of interesting little tidbits that surface in this work. For example, during WW II, the Germans, (with certain Spanish factions) had set up a chain of 14 Infrared detection stations in the Gibraltar Straights linked by radio to wolf packs. These stations would have wreaked havoc on the North Africa campaign. Read the book to find out Philby's part in the operation.

Hardcover. 677 pages, 16 page index, 34 pages of footnotes, 16 pages of photographs. Availability; out of print but still available as a used book (Amazon & B&N).

Marching Orders The Untold Story of World War II by Bruce Lee. (pub Crown Publishers, © 1995). Chronologically tells the story of WW II as revealed through declassified decrypts of Ultra and Magic. A sizeable portion of the story comes directly from Baron Oshima, the Japanese ambassador to Hitler's High Command. While the Allies sporadically read German High Command transmissions (Ultra), more consistent intelligence often came from the Japanese diplomatic cables (Magic) because the German High Command revealed their intentions, purposes, and goals to Oshima who faithfully transmitted the information to Tokyo. The author also makes extensive use of declassified US documents to explain Allied reactions to this intelligence. The work concludes with WW II segueing into the Cold War and offers explanations on why things ended up the way they did (e.g. how the Soviets ended up with Berlin). Lee expends much energy debunking the myth that the use of the atom bomb was unnecessary.

Hardcover, 554 pages of text, 33 page appendix of source material, index and a few maps. No table of contents and the chapters are not titled. While Lee deserves high marks for his thorough and unbiased work, it is frankly, a tough read, owing to its tremendous detail. I'd recommend this one to the serious student of WW II.   NOT currently availabe on line at: Borders, Barnes & Noble, or Amazon.   You may be able to find it through "out of print" channels.

Battle of Wits The Complete Story of Codebreaking In World War II  by Stephen Budiansky (pub The Free  Press, (C) 2000). Offers far more detail than Kahn or Bamford owing to it's later publication date and more focused scope.  Gives great insight and fascinating detail on how German and Japanese codes where broken.  Details various co-operative efforts and rivalries between the US Army and Navy, and inter-country efforts such as the US & Great Britain, Great Britain and Poland, etc..  Nicely documented with salient photos (i.e. early Vint Hill, Arlington Hall, Two Rock Ranch, and Bletchley Park), maps, and illustrations.  Provides some insights into early efforts on the "Russian problem", and Soviet penetration of Arlington Hall and GC&CS. Explains why some generals and campaigns were more succesful than others. The author has a mastrers degree in applied math from Harvard.  Five appendices, source notes, bibliography, and index.  Availability: on line & in stock through: Borders, Barnes & Nobel, and Amazon. A great addition for your permanent collection.  Treats cryptanalysis in a clear and understandable fashion but is not limited to that topic.
The Chinese Black Chamber An Adventure in Espionage by Herbert Osborn Yardley.  (pub Houghton Mifflin Company, (C) 1983)  Yardley was the founder of MI8 Cipher Bureau, the great, great, great grandfather of ASA. This is his personal account of his 20 months in wartime Chungking, China ('38-'40) while the city was being bombed and he was instructing his Chinese employers (Chiang Kai-shek's army) in the fine arts of cryptanalysis.  His efforts were not overly effective due in large part to a lack of intercepts.  There are two accounts of "nailing" foreign agents (working for the Japanese).  He also cracked a case where Chinese were working against Chiang Kai-shek  in an attempt to strike a peace deal with the Japanese.  Throughout the stories Yardley encounters several attractive women who assist him and like the Bond novels, they all come to a bad end or leave him.  Hardcover, 225 pages with an introduction by James Bamford (see Puzzle Palace below) and closing remarks by Mrs. Edna Ramsaier Yardley.  The book was written sometime between 1941-45 but was not published until later due to Yardley's past experiences with the federal government after he published The American Black Chamber in 1931. Upon leaving China, he worked briefly for the Signal Corps explaining his solutions of Japanese army crypto systems.  This was followed by employment with the Canadian government Examination Unit.  Other books by Yardley include: Yardleygrams, The Blonde Countess (made into the movie Rendezvous), Red Sun of Nippon, Crows Are Black Everywhere (with Carl Grabo) and The Education of a Poker Player.  Availability:  out of print; try http://www.harvestbooks.com
Dirty Little Secrets of the Vietnam War by James F. Dunnigan and Albert A Nofi.  (pub. Thomas Dunne Books, (C) 1999) Despite it's sensationalist title, this is a pretty good book and unlike my original misgivings, it is factual and unbiased. If it has any sins at all, they are sins of ommission.  Such topics as; ASA and Op Plan 32, for example are never mentioned. Noteworthy topics include;
    ELECTRONICS While America was the acknowledged leader in high tech during the Vietnam War, the North            Vietnamese were not without resources in this area. In the field,, an infantry battalion rarely had more than half a          dozen Chinese-made radios.  These had a range of some fifty kilometers and were only used for communication      between companies and battalion headquarters in emergencies or as part of a deception. The Communists knew          that the Americans had an enormous advantage in electronic warfare equipment.  US radio detection gear could          fix the location of Communist radios within minutes and have artillery fire or bombs on the target within one hour          or less.  Communist units relied more on telephone wire laid through the jungle, troops carrying messages or other        signals (rifle shots, flares, etc.) to communicate in battle.

    An American infantry battalion had over a hundred radios of various types and these were used freely in the field.       The Communists used this abundance of enemy radio traffic as one of their own weapons. Using captured US       radios manned by English-speaking operators, the Communists would monitor American radio traffic during     operations and, despite code words and the like, were able to obtain a lot of information on what the enemy was         up to.  This provided a tremendous advantage, for the Communist units sent nearly all their messages by foot or             telephone and were thus almost impossible to intercept.  Meanwhile, American and South Vietnamese units       broadcast their plans for the Communists to hear.  Using spies in South Vietnamese and American base camps,             it was often possible to obtain code words and battle plans that made the seemingly chaotic American radio             traffic provide useful information for Communist troops.

    There was even more extensive electronic gear in North Vietnam, along with thousands of Russian soldiers to help     maintain and operate it.  Again, this Russian and Chinese gear was no match for the higher tech and better built US       stuff, but taking advantage of the American sense of superiority in this area, the Communists were able to keep          everyone wondering how they knew so much.

       And from THE PROBLEM OF MOLES (on the subject of loss of  US SOGs)

   All was revealed some twenty years later, when the Walker family of spies was caught and tried.  Several of the       Walkers worked with secret codes, and from about 1968, they were selling these to the Soviet Union.  The       Russians, now able to read our secret messages, and allowed to set up monitoring stations anywhere the North       Vietnamese had a military presence, were apparently passing SOG information back to the North Vietnamese.               The Russians had a vested interest in doing this and hurting SOG.  At times there were hundreds of Russian                 advisers in Laos, and the bombers SOG teams called in didn't discriminate between Russian or Vietnamese                   Communists.

   Between this book and the Battlefield: Vietnam TV series (PBS and other cable outlets) you        get a balanced and fairly complete account of the war.  Softcover, 374 pages, table of                contents,    index, rcommended reading, and glossary.  Every chapter is loaded with tables.        Available via               Barnes and Nobel (off the shelf).

Assault on the Liberty by James M. Ennes, Jr. (pub. Random House, (C) 1979)  Then Lieutenant Jim Ennes, a specialist in cryptology who served as Liberty's Electronic Materiel Officer, was Liberty's officer-of-the-deck when the ship was attacked some 13 miles from shore.  This is an eyewitness account of that June '67 Israeli attack that killed 34, wounded 171, and lasted over two hours.  The ship was flying an oversized special holiday American flag (unfurled in a more than adequate wind) and was clearly in international waters.  The ship was repeatedly reconnoitered by Israeli aircraft prior to the attack.

The book can be divided into four sections -- prelude (ch 1-5), attack (ch 6-8), cover up (ch 9-12), and aftermath/more cover up (ch 13-16).  You could not ask for a more extensively documented account.  Besides the 16 chapters, there is an Epilogue (offering a very plausible theory on why the Israelis attacked), an Author's Note, a map with a time line detailing the attack, 20 Appendixes, plus an index. It took over twelve years to research and write.  Hardcover.  Available... in the author's words "I only have a few copies left so cannot guarantee supply until I have more printed.  Best to check : http://www.ussliberty.org/jim/ussliberty/jimsbook.txt for latest information on availability and price"

Code To Victory by Arnold C. Franco (pub. Sunflower University Press, (C) 1998) The author was a German linguist/TA/CA trained at Vint Hill and shipped to England in Aprill '44 as a member of the Army Air Corp 3rd Radio Squadron Mobile -- 9th Air Force, intercepting "low level" Luftwaffe morse & voice. Three noteable observations: 1) a Luftwaffe weather sqdn. daily supplied code keys by sending the same data type without deviation, 2) the Battle of the Bulge might have been much less costly if SHAFE had headed 3rd RSM warnings of a German behind the lines assault 3) almost as soon as the Germans surrendered, the unit was "monitoring the Russians".  Outstanding documentation (photos, maps, diaries, and official archives).  Softcover, 238 pages, Bibliography, and Index. Available via Sunflower University Press 1-800-258-1232.
A Yank Down Under by Ray A. Wyatt. (pub. Sunflower University Press, (C) 1999)  The autobiographical account of a Kansas farm boy who enlisted in in the Army Sept., 1941.  He trained as a  Radio Operator (Morse) -Fixed Staion and shipped off to Australia as a Staff Sergeant with the 997th Signal Service Co..  He had many assignments in Australia and for a time was assigned as intercept op in Melbourne where he learned to copy Katakana.  His service essentially ended in New Guinea where, by then, he was down to 137 pounds and sufered from combat fatigue after 35 months under  mostly hostile conditions.  Softcover, 226 pages with index and a selected reading list.  Many excellent b&w photographs and a table of Katakana Morse (symbol-English-morse).  Available via Sunflower University Press 1-800-258-1232.
One To Count Cadence by James Crumley. (pub. Vintage Contemporarries (Div of Random House) , (C) 1969) Sargent Krummel trick two trick chief has a masters's degree in Russian history, so naturally, he is assigned to the 721st COMSEC DET at Clark, PI. He has an ex-wife back in the states who left him for 'a cause', and an unshakeable belief that he (ex-infantry) "is the final moment of a proud descent of professional killers, warriors, men of strength whose only concern with virtue lay in personal honor."  His group gets sent to Viet Nam and after spending weeks setting up on Hill 527 gets overrun and put out of business minutes after going operational.  A psychological study with time and scene shifting.  Softcover, 338 pages, available via www.bn.com (Barnes & Nobel) (And in case you forgot its; "bleep 'em all but 9; 6 pallbearers, 2 roadguards, and 1 to count cadence")
Beller's Fellars by Vern Greunke (pub. Vern Greunke Enterpises, (C) 1997) Sp/4 Greunke's tour of Nam as an Air-Mobile, "Fly-Away", jeep mounted , PRD-1 operating, O54 (duffer).  More specifically, it is his letters home from the central highlands supporting the 330th, 303rd, and 509th.  Here is more shameless self-promotion in the author's own words:

Subj: Bellar's
Date: 9/7/00 11:31:57 PM Eastern Daylight Time
From: heyvern@asalives.com (Vern Greunke)
To: Jchrzastek@aol.com
Beller's Fellars (The Book) is available directly through me ..... $8 postpaid ... and yes still available. I added a couple pages too! Also now available ... Beller's Fellars .. (The Video) ... $8. PP .. 350 slides from vietnam with a period rock music background ...And last but not least ... Beller's Fellars (The CD-Rom) ... $8 PP 500 slides in high res format complete with Free Slide Show Viewer.  Best deals ... any 2 for $15 ... all three for $20 ..... you can't beat it!

PS .... if you are not aware ... I increased the speed of the search engine .... database now standing at 21400 + The DATABASE is NOW located at:
http://www.5starpicks.com/asalives/secure/asalocator.html
USER NAME:                    //sorry-for legit ASAer's only- you'll have to pester Verne for it ~cs
PASSWORD:                     //sorry-for legit ASAer's only- you'll have to pester Verne for it ~cs
Please let me know of any changes to your data or if you see errors & omittions in yours' or others' records - IF YOU ARE APPRECATIVE of finding your old friends and want to help me out - get a copy of my Book, or the NEW! VIDEO with 350 Pictures of Vietnam and Period Music Background - (it's had GREAT reviews!)
"BELLER'S FELLARS" - A Year in Letters - Vietnam 1966-67 (The Book)
"BELLER'S FELLARS" - The Video
$8 POSTPAID (Self-Published/Printed) - for Book or Video
BEST DEAL! - Both items $15 Postage Paid
Vern Greunke - PO Box 124 - Cedar Bluffs, NE 68015 - 402-628-2820


I thank you greatly for any help you can in support of my data collection efforts in keeping my internet connection open though all database info is FREE and always will be! - vern
PS. normally I post new entries about once a month.  If you don't see your name for a while ... just remember ... it's like my gut ... "I'm WORKING on it! :-)

The Blankenship Solution by Thomas Kistner (pub. Xlibris, (C) 2000). Fictional account of a handful of ditty bops TDY to Wakkanai  in the late 50s to track their navy. Can be ordered direct from pub: www.Xlibris.com or Amazon.com . Lots of fun, language a little rough for civilians (but not quite as bad as real GI chatter - not that any of us...) Note(1) (2)
Day of Deceit The Truth About FDR and Pearl Harbor by Robert B. Stinnett (pub. Free Press, (C) 2000 ) Extensively documented account of the attack on Pearl. Disputes previous claims of Japanese radio silence. FDR not only knew it was coming but provoked it.  (Order via Amazon.com, BN.com, and others)
The Code Breakers by David Kahn (pub. Macmillan Co., (C) 1967) 3,000 years of cryptography and cryptanalysis. Original was weighty hardback, the paperback version was abridged by the author.  An updated version ((C) 1996) is available via BN.com.
The Puzzle Palace  by James Bamford (pub.Penguin Books, (C) 1982) NSA and it's history. Good source material, bibliographical notes, acronyms and abbreviations, and indexed.  Paperback 655 pages.  Still available via Amazon.com
Bucher: My Story by Lloyd Bucher (Cmdr. USS Pueblo) (pub. Dell, (C) 1970)   Eyewitness account of the event, the events leading up to it, captivity, and the aftermath.  Paperback 433 pages, 8 appendices, glossary, but no index.  Available via BN.com.
Traitors Among Us Inside the Spy Catcher's World by Stuart A. Herrington (pub. Presidio Press, (C) 1999) Col.Herrington's career in MI spanned 30 years culminating in  the Foreign Counterintelligence Activity. This books covers three cases from his FCA years. The last two make up the majority of the book: Clyde Conrad & WO James Hall (INSCOM). If you ever wondered how "sellouts" were caught, this book will help provide insights. Hardback, 409 pages, no index. Available via Amazon.com, BN.com, & others. 
Stalking the Vietcong Inside Operation Phoenix a Personal Account by Stuart A. Herrington (pub. Presidio Press, (C) 1982.  (see above -- it is recommended that the serious reader read this work first for background).  This is not a shoot 'em up. It deals with the author's (near) 4 year  tour in Vietnam as a CIC officer working to turn VC/NVA to our side as part of Operation Phoenix. Paperback, 222 pages, with glossary, appendix of captured photos, and index.  (Originally pub as Silence Was a Weapon)   Available via Amazon.com, BN.com, & others.  (No mention of ASA)
War Secrets in The Ether by Wilhelm Flicke. (pub. Aegean Park Press, (C) 1989)  Spans Germany's radio intercept operations from 'day-one' to the end of WW II. Good background material showing that many countries have had intercept and cryptanalysis capabilities.  You'll see how Rommel, the Desert Fox, got to be such a revered general. Paperback 234 pages.  Index.
The Origin and Development of the Army Security Agency 1917-1947 by Unknown (pub. Aegean Park Press, (C) 1978)  Declassified -- originally; "A Lecture On ...".  Goes all the way back to the MI-8 Cipher Bureau and continues to the end of World War II.  Paperback, 51 pages, personality index, subject index, and ASA lineage index.
Achievements of the Signal Security Agency In World War II by Unknown ("Prepared Under the Direction of The Assistant Chief of Staff, G-2 WDGSS-14 Feb. 20, 1946) (Pub. Aegean Park Press, (C) 1995)  Three chapters: building the organization, production of information, and preservation of security.  Picks up at the end of WW I, the interim period, both theaters of WW II.  Lists and tables of staff levels, intercept sites, traffic intercept volumes, equipment used. Appendix: code cracking responsibilities 1861-1945, work flow, the Dewey letter, sundry broken messages, etc..  Index.  Paperback, 77 pages.
You're No Good To Me Dead by Bob Stahl (pub. Naval Institute Press, (C) 1995) Bob Stahl began his WW II Army service as an enlisted man (operator/cryptographer) at Vint Hill.  He was soon shipped to MacArthur's Allied Intelligence Bureau GHQ in Australia.  He then volunteered for service as a costal watcher/intelligence collector/agent handler/saboteur in the Philippines, 1,500 miles behind enemy lines.  (MacArthur  would not allow the OSS in "his" theater.)  This is NOT Hollywood's "South Pacific".  Stahl's tour eventually stretched to 15 months during which he lost 55 pounds.  Hardback, 196 pages.


Your reviews...

For all you who have spent time in Japan, I would like to recommend a book that my friend, Lou Marinaccio told me about. The title of the book is "Blossoms in the Wind" by M.G. Shetfall. It is an inspiring story of the Japanese Kamikaze pilots during WWII. It also contains factual information about the people of Japan and what life was like prior to, during and after WWII. I guarantee you will not be bored by this book.
Ron Dakin


Note (1)
Subj: Blankenship Solution
From: Clark Halstead

"Boys if you haven't got your copy let me encourage you to do so as I found it very enjoyable and would have read it in one setting but being at home there is always something to come up at the most critical point..."

"I could picture the antics in town very easily and could relate to a lot of it even though I wasn't in on the real goings on of that place . I think you'll enjoy it even though the writer was supposed to have came to Chitose from the base in Hawaii and some up from Ojiie( Hope that is spelled right) but don think so but it was This first camp most went to when they came to Japan. A lot of good belly rumbling laugh in it also some serious stuff. Catch you later Clark."

Note (2) 

Subj: Thank you crazy stick
Date: 8/23/00 7:22:16 PM Eastern Daylight Time
From: Sollemas
To: Jchrzastek
Hey John,
"Thanks for your kind words about Blankenship."... "As to your interest in other works, yes there are four more on the way. The next is called "Jimmy at Playland" and involves a New Jersey teen age kid who blows away half the mob in the Garden State in avenging his father's murder. It's not purely autobiographical but much of the plot is drawn from personal experience. It's a week or so from being on the web site. Take a look at it....better yet take a look at all of them as they surface over the ensuing months and if one or more of the tomes grab your fancy........act accordingly. In no way, John, am I asking you or your friends to buy any of my books, heh, heh. They are available on Amazon.com and soon on Bordersbooks.com as well as my own web site: http://www.xlibris.com/thomasfkistner.html "

Thanks again,
Sp-3 Tom Kistner


Suggested Sources:
Sunflower University Press, 1531 Yuma, PO Box 1009, Manhattan, Kansas 66505-1009.  Orders 1-800-258-1232, FAX 785-539-2233, Phone 785-539-1888
Aegean Park Press http://www.aegeanparkpress.com PO Box 2837, Laguna Hills, CA 92654 (949)-586-8811  Many excellent books on cryptography, intelligence, and like maters.
National Security Agency  (http://www.nsa.gov) publishes many pamphlets available free for the taking in the lobby of the National Cryptologic Museum.  Write to: Center for Cryptologic History, National Security Agency, Fort George G. Meade, Maryland, 20755-6886, Attn: S542. (The Venona material is online.)
The Naval Institute Press (US Naval Institute) 118 Maryland Ave., Annapolis, MD 21402-5035 (1-800-233-USNI for a free catalog).  Publishing since 1898, 400 titles in print, well known for the monthly Proceedings and  the bi-monthly Naval History.

Email for this web site should be sent to asachitose@aol.com or asachitose@gmail.com